The Rain Dance Worked

The forecast did not indicate a gully-washer anytime this week and yet we had lots and lots of rain, some thunder and lightning and some flooding.  The flooding did not come from the rain, though, our water heater chose this week to poop out.  I am happy to say that my husband did not let any grass grow under his feet to get it replaced.  So all is well and as you who follow my blog or garden avidly know that after the rain is a great time to weed so that is what I will be doing this weekend.  In the meantime, here are a few pics as my garden transitions from spring blooms to heat-loving summer blossoms.

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Happy weeding and remember to “bee” positive!

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Rain Dance Schmail Dance – This might be what I’m looking for…

With summer fast approaching, I have been looking at alternatives to watering from the outdoor faucet. A rain barrel is a great idea but still sort of mysterious in that I don’t fully comprehend how it will fit with my soaker hoses etc. I love this post.
Conservative gardening and remember to “bee” positive

The Garden Diary

Our new fence created a little nook that quickly became a potting area complete with …. TA DAH!…. A rain barrel.

We have wanted a rain barrel for a long time and this is the perfect one for this space. It isn’t even installed yet and already I am thinking I probably need another one. Please don’t mention that to Mr. G. At least until the temperature leaves the 90s.

It is going to be so wonderful to have 50 gallons of rain water!

Do you have a rain barrel?

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Woodland Perennials II

I have Epimedium envy but it is far too hot here for these beauties to survive. These are lovely though…

Happy Gardening and remember to “bee” positive!

Mike's Garden Top 5 Plants

Epimedium x versicolor ‘Sulphureum’ – Commonly known as Barrenwort or Bishop’s Hat, this semi-evergreen perennial bears primrose yellow flowers from mid to late spring. The heart-shaped leaflets emerge with a distinct reddish-bronze tinge, maturing to green. This Award of Garden Merit winner is drought tolerant once established. Grows 12-15″ high. Zone 5.

Meconopsis betonicifolia (recently reclassified as M. baileyi) – The Tibetan Blue Poppy  is a much coveted but difficult to grow perennial. Discovered in 1912, it bears 3-4″ wide translucent sky-blue blooms in early summer. It is herbaceous and short-lived, preferring part sun and even soil moisture during summer. Grows 24-36″ high by 12-18″ wide. Hardy to zone 3.

Polygonatum x hybridum – The Common Solomon’s Seal is a cross of P. multiflorum and P. odoratum. It bears clusters (usually 4) of creamy-white flowers with green tips, trailing below the arching stems. The green lance-shaped leaves are…

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Triplet Sighting: Fledgling Robins are Alive and Well!

I thought we had bid a final farewell to the triplets; Winken, Blinken, and Nod, the baby robins who grew up before our eyes but I have an update.  Three fledgling robins are handing out in our shade garden.  Their flight is very limited but they are learning how to look for their own dinner.  I thought they might be our triplets but wasn’t sure because our shade garden is a great sight for fledgling birds.  Fresh water, enclosed space, lots of places to hide.  But I was assured these are our babies when mom robin flew in with a mouthful of wormy goodness and all three ran to her.  So I am happy to report they are alive and well.  My camera is not great for long-range photos so I have enhanced them circling the little darlings so you can make them out.

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Happy Gardening and remember to “bee” positive!

I Will Grow Them, Sam I Am!

As I write this post, I am reminded of the treasured childrens’ book by Dr. Seuss, Green Eggs And Ham. If you are like most Americans, you will catch this reference immediately.  If you have never read this classic American literary work, take yourself forthwith to the nearest library and check it out as you have missed a critical rite of passage in growing up in America.  If you did not grow up in America, check it out anyway, it’s a good read.

The way this is relevant to this discussion is that I had previously posted an entry on growing Hollyhocks: https://gardenlifedesigns.wordpress.com/2012/04/27/old-fashioned-hollyhocks-not-lovin-them/ in which I expressed a less-than-successful trial of growing these old fashioned beauties listing the pest and disease problems they are prone to during the three years I have tried to grow them.  As they were forming buds to finally flower, I predicted that the resulting blooms would not be spectacular enough to warrant the trouble to grow them.  Boy was I wrong!  Check out these babies:

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So I will grow them with the pests,

And I will grow them with the rust,

I will grow them here and there,

Heck, I will grow them anywhere!

I’m in love with them, I AM I AM

I do love Hollyhocks in the end.

Happy gardening and remember to “bee” positive!

Final Farewell to the Triplets

One last post about the robin nest in our garden.  Three beautiful robins’ egg blue eggs that hatched and grew up in front of our eyes.  We named them the triplets: Winken, Blinken and Nod.  They are gone now.  Grown.  At least old enough to have flown away.  I still catch a glimpse of Nod in the trees now and then and Mom and Dad are still around but all have deserted the nest.  Sure is lonely.  I miss the little ones but it was wonderful watching them grow.  It was too fast – 12 days from hatching to flight.  Here is a record of their time with us:

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Happy Days and remember to “bee” positive!